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Monthly Archives: January 2017

About Volleyball Drills

Cooperative Games

Pepper is a favorite warm-up for volleyball players everywhere. It quite effectively has the players working on passing, setting, and hitting skills. If we expand that beyond 2-3 players and start bringing in more players – up to full 6 v 6 – we can have a very adaptable drill which can be used for warm-ups, to work on all facets of ball-handling, and to focus on certain types of offense and/or defense strategies. Because the idea is to keep the ball in play rather than going for kills, you automatically get longer rallies and thereby more touches for everyone involved, and you do so in game-like situations. And lest the players get too focused on hitting the ball at each other, you can always use a cooperative play to lead into full play or small-side games.

Team Serving & Passing

We all know that good serving and solid passing are the foundations of volleyball success. A simple way to work on these two skills is to split your team in half and have one side serve to the other. What makes this such a useful drill is how you can use scoring and competition to adapt it to different training needs. And you can add follow-up skills such as servers covering a setter dump or the passing team running an offensive play to raise the stakes.

Advantages of Rugby for Children

Rugby like other sports has benefits to the body where it is known to enhance the physical strength and abilities of the children to make them healthy and strong both mentally and physically.

• Increases physical fitness – As the game involves running around the rugby field with a goal to make the rugby ball reach the other end, it improves the fitness of the body. The exercises involved in the training procedure builds the muscles and the growth of the bones to provide their bodies with a better structure while they grow up.

• Improved moral and ethical senses – The game has a rule for itself and thus whether it is a training session or a competitive match, each player is deemed to follow the norms of the game. It involves strict rule maintenance and thus bringing about a strong moral and ethical sense in their minds. They can apply the same in the different tasks that they perform in life whether in the present or the future.

• Develops healthy team spirit – While the players of a rugby team play in unison, it brings about the sense of positive team spirit in them where they understand the value of healthy competition with the other team and the fact that they have to play for their team to make it win.

• The sense of evaluation and concentration – Rugby is a game that requires analysis and assessment while on the field. The player has to evaluate the paths that they need to run down to dodge opponents and reach with the ball to the other side. It increases their sense of concentration at a young age and thus making it come to good use in their academics as well.

All about Baseball Hitting

Striding With the Front Toes Slightly Closed

If your toes are slightly closed, it encourages you to keep your front hip and front shoulder closed as well. In other words, instead of having the toes pointing straight out away from your body when you take your stride, turn them an inch or two inward, back toward the catcher. If you point the front toes out toward the pitcher, it will encourage you to open your front side too early which will create many baseball hitting problems.

Have the Bat Fully Loaded When the Stride Foot Touches the Ground

All good hitters have the bat in the “launching position” when their front foot completes the stride. You stride and then you swing. They are two separate movements that should happen very quickly and smoothly but they are separate movements.

Making an Aggressive Motion Toward The Pitcher

A lot of hitters do not do this but all the great hitters do. That is where the ball is coming from and that’s where you should be going. Real good hitters go into the ball to hit it. It’s a common baseball hitting problem to not go toward the pitcher when swinging. The reason it’s such a common baseball hitting problem is because it is simply not natural to move your body toward a baseball that someone is throwing in your direction.

Having a Tension Free Swing

“Tension is a hitter’s worst enemy,” is a quote that’s been around for decades and is still one of the best baseball tips on hitting. Tension destroys a fluid, graceful swing that’s necessary for hitting the ball properly. Don’t squeeze the bat too tightly and don’t tighten up your muscles. Like mentioned above, many very good hitters have a slight waggle to help them relax.

Head Behind the Swing

The real good hitters actually see the ball a little longer than the weaker hitters. They literally lower and turn their heads when making contact. You simply can not keep your head facing the pitcher and look at the baseball out of the corners of your eyes when trying to make contact.

Hitting to All Fields

Rarely will you find a hitter with a high batting average who limits himself to hitting the ball to only one part of the field. Pay attention to the old expression, “hit it where it’s pitched.” In the long run, you will be much better off.

Defend Against Dink in Volleyball

Positional responsibility

After attitude comes positioning. The players with designated responsibility for tip coverage, if any, are determined by the type of defense a team employs. For example, a rotational defense in which the right back player moves up behind the block on an outside hitter attack means that right back defender is responsible for shots over the block and into the middle of the court. In a standard perimeter defense there is no specifically designated tip coverage player, so basically it is up to the player(s) closest to the ball to make the dig.

Expecting the shot

This is perhaps the most important part of being good at off-speed defense. Tips, roll shots, and the like tend to score more because defenders are surprised than because they are well-placed. A prime example of this is setter dumps scoring when in most teams’ base defense there are two players specifically placed to defend against the first or second ball coming over. If those players expect the setter to dump they will often make a rather easy play on the ball. If not, they are caught flat-footed and the ball drops – a source of many a coach’s grey hairs.

Moving through the ball

As noted above, defense against an off-speed shot is often about pursuit. A player must move to the ball to make the play on it. In many instances the player has to run to get the ball and may not be able to be stopped in time to make a good play. In these cases they need to be able to execute a run-through dig to the favored target zone. This is something which requires training for less advanced players as the mechanics involved are a bit different than the normal more static dig or pass.